Nice Cool Kitchen photos

By | August 3, 2018

A few nice cool kitchen images I found:

Image from page 33 of “The Architect & engineer of California and the Pacific Coast” (1905)
cool kitchen
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: architectenginee5017sanf
Title: The Architect & engineer of California and the Pacific Coast
Year: 1905 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: Architecture Architecture Architecture Building
Publisher: San Francisco, Calif. : Architect and Engineer Co
Contributing Library: San Francisco Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: San Francisco Public Library

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Text Appearing Before Image:
When wrilinn to Ailvenii Tim .IKCIllTliCT .1X1) HNGIXflER SOMETHING NEW! Auxiliary Units to HOOSIER Cabinet Cupboard, Cooler, Chest and Drawer Units furnished insections so one or all can be added to Regular Cabinet,thus making the HOOSIER a full Kitchen Equipment. Insures Economy of Space, Harmony and Uniformityin appearance. Takes the place of old fashioned and Un-sanitary Built-in Cupboards.

Text Appearing After Image:
Architects and Builders will be furnished free full details,measurements and blue prints of this ideal method ofequipping kitchens. THE HOOSIER MFG. CO. NEW CASTLE, IND. BRANCH 1067 Market Street, S.N FR.NCISCO Telephone Market 8S.S4 When writing lo Advertisers please mcnti.m this niagazii THE ARCHITECT AXD EXGIXEER 29

Note About Images
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Food Fridays: William Bednar
cool kitchen
Image by national museum of american history
While we endured historically high temperatures on July 31st, the Museum’s Chef Bednar helped us explore traditions of chilling out in the kitchen with cold foods. We considered naturally cooling food and drink, and looked for methods to put summertime produce to work in cold dishes.

Food Fridays will showcase a guest chef and a Smithsonian host preparing a recipe and talking about the history and traditions behind its ingredients, culinary techniques, and enjoyment. Beginning July 3, and continuing every Friday through December, we’ll be turning up the heat on food history at the museum’s new demonstration kitchen on the Coulter Performance Plaza.

Every week we’ll cook something different, but the food we make will always tie back to our exhibitions, research, and collections (some of those objects might even be brought out of storage!).

Image from page 470 of “Popular science monthly” (1872)
cool kitchen
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: popularsciencemo89newyuoft
Title: Popular science monthly
Year: 1872 (1870s)
Authors:
Subjects: Science
Publisher: New York : D. Appleton
Contributing Library: Gerstein – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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Text Appearing Before Image:
re with-in, the degree of cooling beingdependent on the rareficationand amount of condensation pro-duced. It is this principle whichis employed in the iVIe.xican Oya,or water bottle, which is made ofthick porous clay which sweatsprofusely, cooling the water within. A Typewriter Desk Made from aKitchen Table A KITCHEN table was convertedinto a typewriter desk in the fol-lowing manner: An i8-in. by 24-in.bread-board was purchased from thehardware store and some pieces of i-in.by 2-in. soft wood obtained. Two piecesof the latter were placed across the underside of the table, from the back to thefront boards, serving as guides for thebread-board. Two more pieces werefastened to the board near one end andarranged to fit o-er the side pieces. The board was put in place as a shelfunder the table and a final cross stripof the I-in. by 2-in. board was fastenedto hold the front in place and allow theboard to slide under the lower edge ofthe front board.—E. W. Hyman. 457 POSITION FIXtDTD WALL

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Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

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